♫ August 9, 2014 ̓
Now to the infantry—the God-damned infantry, as they like to call themselves.

I love the infantry because they are the underdogs. They are the mud-rain-frost-and-wind boys. They have no comforts, and they even learn to live without the necessities. And in the end they are the guys that wars can’t be won without.

I wish you could see just one of the ineradicable pictures I have in my mind today. In this particular picture I am sitting among clumps of sword-grass on a steep and rocky hillside that we have just taken. We are looking out over a vast rolling country to the rear.

A narrow path comes like a ribbon over a hill miles away, down a long slope, across a creek, up a slope and over another hill.

All along the length of this ribbon there is now a thin line of men. For four days and nights they have fought hard, eaten little, washed none, and slept hardly at all. Their nights have been violent with attack, fright, butchery, and their days sleepless and miserable with the crash of artillery.

The men are walking. They are fifty feet apart, for dispersal. Their walk is slow, for they are dead weary, as you can tell even when looking at them from behind. Every line and sag of their bodies speaks their inhuman exhaustion.

On their shoulders and backs they carry heavy steel tripods, machine-gun barrels, leaden boxes of ammunition. Their feet seem to sink into the ground from the overload they are bearing.

They don’t slouch. It is the terrible deliberation of each step that spells out their appalling tiredness. Their faces are black and unshaven. They are young men, but the grime and whiskers and exhaustion make them look middle-aged.

In their eyes as they pass is not hatred, not excitement, not despair, not the tonic of their victory—there is just the simple expression of being here as though they had been here doing this forever, and nothing else.

The line moves on, but it never ends. All afternoon men keep coming round the hill and vanishing eventually over the horizon. It is one long tired line of antlike men.

There is an agony in your heart and you almost feel ashamed to look at them. They are just guys from Broadway and Main Street, but you wouldn’t remember them. They are too far away now. They are too tired. Their world can never be known to you, but if you could see them just once, just for an instant, you would know that no matter how hard people work back home they are not keeping pace with these infantrymen in Tunisia.
- "The God-damned Infantry," Ernie Pyle 2 May 1943 (via demons)

whisper-s-of-the-heart:

8prometheus8:

This is something that slips past the Western viewers- it looks like it’s reaching out for Chihiro, in a malicious way, to the Western viewers. It’s what I thought growing up.
However, now, that I know that it’s a way of signalling for someone to ‘Come here!’ in Japan, the scene takes on a whole new meaning.
That spirit knows that if Chihiro doesn’t eat the food, she will disappear. And it knows if it offers the food, she cannot be cursed as a gluttonous pig because it wouldn’t have been stolen.
Just a unique take when you have all of the context.

And also, the red lanterns spell out ‘おいで’ which translates to “Come here” or “Come in” :)

whisper-s-of-the-heart:

8prometheus8:

This is something that slips past the Western viewers- it looks like it’s reaching out for Chihiro, in a malicious way, to the Western viewers. It’s what I thought growing up.

However, now, that I know that it’s a way of signalling for someone to ‘Come here!’ in Japan, the scene takes on a whole new meaning.

That spirit knows that if Chihiro doesn’t eat the food, she will disappear. And it knows if it offers the food, she cannot be cursed as a gluttonous pig because it wouldn’t have been stolen.

Just a unique take when you have all of the context.

And also, the red lanterns spell out ‘おいで’ which translates to “Come here” or “Come in” :)

militaryhistoryphotos:

German soldier lights a cigarette with his comrade’s FmW35 flamethrower, 1940. 

militaryhistoryphotos:

German soldier lights a cigarette with his comrade’s FmW35 flamethrower, 1940. 

We received the following message tied to a stone from the opposite German trenches. —-We’re going to open fire with artillery. We don’t want to do this but we’ve been ordered to. It will come this evening, and we’ll blow a whistle first so you’ll have time to take cover.
- Regimental War Diary, 5th Leicester Regiment, World War I. (via peashooter85)
1,224 notes
♫ 1 month ago
♫ via rangie  
WWI ♪ Historical Nerdom ♪

historicaltimes:

Dog-drawn gun carriages are used by Belgian troops to transport machine guns on the Western Front. 5 December 1914.

historicaltimes:

Dog-drawn gun carriages are used by Belgian troops to transport machine guns on the Western Front. 5 December 1914.

lostsplendor:

"Glamour of the Allies": French Postcard Set c. 1917 via Tuckdb

Give me the strength not to go write essays about these immediately.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Kwon Ki-ok (1901-1988)
Art by Sushu Xia (tumblr)
Born and raised in Pyongyang, Ki-ok spent time in prison as a young woman because of her involvement in anti-colonial protests.  She eventually fled Japanese controlled Korea and moved to China.  With the approval of the Korean Provisional Government, Ki-ok entered the Republic of China Air Force School in 1923 and graduated in 1925.  She was the first Korean women to hold a pilot license.
Ki-ok served in the Chinese Air Force until 1945, eventually reaching the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  Ki-ok then returned to Korea where she helped found the Republic of Korea Air Force.  During the Korean War, she served in South Korea’s Ministry of National Defense before retiring from public service.

coolchicksfromhistory:

Kwon Ki-ok (1901-1988)

Art by Sushu Xia (tumblr)

Born and raised in Pyongyang, Ki-ok spent time in prison as a young woman because of her involvement in anti-colonial protests.  She eventually fled Japanese controlled Korea and moved to China.  With the approval of the Korean Provisional Government, Ki-ok entered the Republic of China Air Force School in 1923 and graduated in 1925.  She was the first Korean women to hold a pilot license.

Ki-ok served in the Chinese Air Force until 1945, eventually reaching the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.  Ki-ok then returned to Korea where she helped found the Republic of Korea Air Force.  During the Korean War, she served in South Korea’s Ministry of National Defense before retiring from public service.

thattallnerdygirl:

♫ August 8, 2014 ♫

naziswithcats:

Peter, mascot of the German submarine U-953 during WW2

bookshelvesofdoom:

annaflea:

So I read this story and just HAD to draw it. I can’t even remember the last time I did a comic… It was so fun! I’ll have to do more. :)

Original story by - angergirl

LOVE THIS. <3

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